Vadala Real Estate | Gloucester Real Estate, Rockport Real Estate, Manchester Real Estate


You know that you want to sell your house. However, you're still unsure about how to determine a "fair" price for your residence.

Ultimately, setting a fair price for your home may be easier than you think – here are three tips to help you establish the best price for your house.

1. Study the Housing Market

The housing market constantly changes. Therefore, a buyer's market today may transform into a seller's market tomorrow.

As a home seller, it is essential to analyze housing market data. That way, you can identify real estate market patterns and trends and plan your home selling journey accordingly.

Check out the prices of recently sold houses in your city or town. With this housing market data in hand, you may be better equipped than ever before to differentiate between a buyer's market and a seller's market.

Also, don't forget to assess the prices of available residences that are similar to your own. This housing market data will help you see how your residence stacks up against the competition. It may provide you with the ability to narrow the price range for your home too.

2. Conduct a Home Appraisal

A home appraisal offers a valuable learning opportunity, particularly for a home seller who is uncertain about his or her house's strengths and weaknesses.

Typically, a home appraisal provides a home seller with plenty of actionable insights about the condition of his or her property. The appraisal often helps a home seller prioritize home improvements as well.

During a home appraisal, a property inspector will analyze a house over the course of several hours. After an inspector's evaluation is complete, he or she will provide a home seller with a report that offers comprehensive insights about a home's condition.

A home appraisal can provide a home seller with a better idea about how to price his or her house in its current condition. Then, a home seller can complete assorted home improvements that may help him or her boost a residence's value.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

It never hurts to get expert support as you try to determine the best price for your house. Thus, collaborating with a real estate agent can make a world of difference for a home seller in any housing market, at any time.

A real estate agent can provide guidance as a home seller preps his or her residence for the housing market. This professional can respond to a home seller's price concerns and questions and help a home seller determine what constitutes a fair price based on the current housing market's conditions.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent will help you promote your residence to the right groups of homebuyers consistently. As a result, he or she can help you stir up plenty of interest in your home – something that may lead to multiple offers.

Ready to list your residence? Use these home selling tips, and you can determine the best price for your house.


If you receive an offer to purchase your house, determining how to proceed with this proposal sometimes can be difficult. Ultimately, a home seller needs to weigh the pros and cons of accepting an offer to purchase. And if the pros outweigh the cons, it probably is a good idea to accept the homebuying proposal.

When it comes to reviewing an offer to purchase, there are many reasons why a seller should accept this proposal, and these include:

1. An offer to purchase matches or exceeds a home seller's expectations.

If a home seller receives an offer to purchase at or above the initial asking price for his or her house, accepting the proposal likely is a no-brainer. In fact, a seller may want to provide an instant "Yes" to this offer so he or she can quickly move on to the next step of the property selling journey.

Of course, it helps to establish realistic home selling expectations before listing a residence. If a seller sets a competitive initial asking price that corresponds to his or her home selling expectations, then this individual may be better equipped than others to enjoy a seamless property selling experience.

2. An offer to purchase falls in line with the current housing market's conditions.

If you're selling a home in a buyer's market, you may pounce at the opportunity to accept any offer to purchase that comes your way. Comparatively, if you list your house in a seller's market, you may need to consider all of your options closely before you accept an offer to purchase.

As a home seller, you should evaluate the current state of the real estate market. If you allocate time and resources to learn about the housing market, you can gain real estate market insights to help you determine whether to accept an offer to purchase.

3. An offer to purchase enables a home seller to speed up the property selling process.

If you're operating on a tight home selling timeline, you may be more inclined than ever before to accept an offer to purchase, even if it falls below your initial expectations. Conversely, if you plan ahead for the home selling journey, you may reduce the risk of facing a time crunch to sell your house.

For home sellers, hiring a real estate agent is key. This housing market professional can help a seller prepare for the real estate market and ensure that a seller sets a competitive price for his or her house. Plus, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open house events to showcase a residence to prospective buyers. And if a seller receives an offer to purchase, a real estate agent can provide a recommendation about the best way to respond to this homebuying proposal.

Ready to add your house to the real estate market? Collaborate with a real estate agent, and you can boost the likelihood of getting an offer to purchase your home that allows you to maximize the value of your property.


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If you've owned your house for a long time and are putting it on the market, take time to consider how the buying and selling process has changed. Today’s buyers are both smart and cautious. They have access to more information than was possible a decade ago. Research shows that buyers begin shopping twelve to eighteen months before they're ready to buy. Your real estate professional has inside information on the local market, they can help you navigate the new selling terrain.

Take advice to heart in these essential areas:

  • Choose a reasonable price. Setting the wrong price gets your market plan off on the wrong track. When it’s too high, it will sit on the market for days or weeks derailing your plans to move. You want to get the most that you can from a home sale, but the market will bear only so much. Smart shoppers already know the comparable homes recently sold and come armed with a wealth of information before making their offer. Setting the price too low can backfire too. If a buyer is not interested in rehabilitation or renovation work, they may pass over a property that is not priced competitively.

  • Take great photos. Most serious buyers begin their search online. If your agent suggests hiring a professional real estate photographer, it’s often worth the investment. Internet shoppers quickly pass over blurry, out-of-focus, dark, or cluttered shots. Clean the windows and take pictures with the shades and curtains wide open. Bright and inviting photos encourage the buyer to visit in person.

  • Staging is more than décor. Take the time to remove personal objects, family photos, and collections. Organize your furnishings to make the best use of your space. Downplay dated areas that need updating and focus on the “bones” of the home and curb appeal if the entire house requires a makeover.

  • Test drive the online experience. Go online yourself to see how the photos look. Upload new ones until you're satisfied. Also, check out the street view on Google or Safari Maps. If they post outdated images where curb appeal is lacking, take a similar shot, and post it instead.


Make sure you know how the buyer sees your house when you put it on the market. Modern buyers are cautious. They come armed with information. Let your agent help you address issues relating to how your house appears online.



If you receive an offer to purchase from a property buyer and decide to submit a counter-offer, it is important to err on the side of caution. Because if your counter-proposal fails to meet a buyer's expectations, you risk missing out on the opportunity to sell your house and maximize your home sale earnings.

When it comes to reviewing an offer to purchase and submitting a counter-proposal, it helps to prepare as much as possible. Fortunately, we're here to help you perform a full analysis of a homebuying proposal and ensure that you can submit a counter-offer that matches the expectations of both you and a buyer.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you put together a "fair" counter-proposal to a buyer's offer to purchase your home.

1. Use Housing Market Data to Your Advantage

Take a look at local housing market data – you'll be glad you did. If you take a data-driven approach to craft a counter-offer, you may be better equipped than ever before to put together a counter-proposal that meets the needs of all parties involved in a property sale.

Analyze the prices of recently sold houses in your city or town that are similar to your own. Furthermore, find out how long these residences were available before they sold. With this housing market data in hand, you should have no trouble crafting a fair counter-proposal.

2. Consider the Buyer's Perspective

As you examine a buyer's initial offer to purchase, think about why this individual chose to submit the proposal. Try not to get emotional if you feel the offer is too low; instead, think about how you can work with a buyer to find common ground.

Oftentimes, it helps to maintain open communication with a buyer. If you put together an counter-proposal that accounts for the buyer's perspective and keep in touch with this individual, you and a buyer may be able to work together to come to a fair agreement.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you are unsure about what to propose as part of a counter-offer, there is no need to stress. In fact, if you collaborate with a real estate agent, you can get the assistance you need to craft a counter-proposal that may lead to an instant "Yes" from a buyer.

Usually, a real estate agent will inform you about an offer to purchase your home and provide recommendations and suggestions as you craft a counter-proposal. He or she also will negotiate with a buyer's agent on your behalf. And if you ever have concerns or questions during the property selling journey, a real estate agent is happy to address them.

Allocate time and resources as you craft a counter-offer. If you consider the current state of the real estate market and the buyer's perspective, you could increase your chances of putting together a counter-proposal to close a deal on your home. Perhaps best of all, you can submit a counter-offer that allows both you and a buyer to achieve your respective goals faster than ever before.


Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

All home sellers understand that there are some costs to selling a home, but not everyone realizes what they're expected to pay for (and how much the total will be). We'll look at the most common expenses and how they might affect your budget. 

Real Estate Agent Fees 

This is probably the first thing that comes to mind if you're selling a home. The standard rule is anywhere between 5 to 6% of the final sale price. Not all sellers will shoulder this cost, but the majority will. So if your home sells for $300,000, you should expect to hand over at least $15,000 to be split between the buyer and seller real estate agents. Please note that commissions can be negotiable, especially if you're selling in a popular neighborhood. 

Prep Work 

While none of these costs are strictly necessary, they can help you get your home ready:

  • Repairs: If you're not planning to sell the house as-is, it's a good idea to spruce up the interior and exterior of the property. Even if you're only buying a few cans of paint and a roller, the costs can add up quickly. 
  • Home inspection: Buyers will typically do their own home inspection, but sellers who go above and beyond can give themselves an edge in a competitive market. If you're going out of your way to buy a home inspection, it can show you have nothing to hide. These inspections cost a few hundred dollars and may reveal structural problems that you were unaware of. 
  • Staging: Arranging your furniture to show off the best of the home can really inspire buyers to view its potential. Whether you dress up your home with cozy touches (e.g., cashmere throws, small bouquets, etc.) or more modern decorations, it can help attract the perfect buyer. 

Additional Fees 

If you're moving out before you sell the house, you'll need to continue paying the utilities. You'll also need to check with your lender as to exactly how much you owe when you pay off the loan. Some lenders will charge prepayment fees upon early termination. You may also be asked to either pay or split the closing costs, especially if you're selling in a buyer's market. This can include anything from the title inspector fees to transfer costs. Finally, you may need to pay capital gains tax if your home skyrocketed in value or any lingering property taxes.

Some sellers end up paying closer to 10% of the total sale price of their home, a figure that can be difficult to swallow for many sellers. It's worth clarifying each cost so you always know what you're paying for.




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